Gaming frequency and academic performance

Barry Ip, Gabriel Jacobs, Alan Watkins

Abstract


There are numerous claims that playing computer and video games may be educationally beneficial, but there has been little formal investigation into whether or not the frequency of exposure to such games actually affects academic performance. This paper explores the issue by analysing the relationships between gaming frequency - measured as the amount of time undergraduate students spend playing games in their free time - and their academic performance as measured by their examination marks. Using a sample of 713 students, correlation analyses between gaming frequency and examination performance were conducted for students of varying gaming frequency, study discipline, gender, and general attitudes towards gaming and study. The results reveal that examination marks are in fact negatively correlated with gaming frequency - i.e. frequent gamers generally achieve lower marks than less frequent gamers.

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.14742/ajet.1197

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