Flexibility in access, interaction and assessment: The case for web-based teaching programs

  • Mark Freeman University of Technology, Sydney

Abstract

Potential benefits in re-engineering higher education using Internet-based programs appear promising (Hicks 1997, Geoghegan 1996). The objective of this paper is to report the outcomes of a web-based teaching program trial involving 550 undergraduate business students. The program, called TopClass, provides for private email, public conference discussions, easy and consistent delivery of resources and progress testing via the WWW. Prior Internet experience was very low. Students reported the program provided increased support for their learning, improved access and interactivity. 94% of students felt it would have a positive impact on their grade and 72% would like many or all aspects of the program used in other subjects. Academics seeking to utilise web-based teaching technology to enhance the teaching and learning environment would find these results helpful.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

Metrics

Metrics Loading ...
Published
1997-11-05
How to Cite
Freeman, M. (1997). Flexibility in access, interaction and assessment: The case for web-based teaching programs. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 13(1). https://doi.org/10.14742/ajet.1917