Call for Special Issues

Calls are currently open for:

  1. Future Directions in TPCK/TPACK Research and Development 
  2. Augmenting learner-generated contexts via mobile augmented reality and mobile virtual reality
  3. Learning Design Research: Mapping the terrain

 


 

2017 SPECIAL ISSUE

Future Directions in TPCK/TPACK Research and Development 

Guest Editors                       

  • Judith B. Harris, College of William & Mary
  • Michael Phillips, Monash University
  • Matthew J. Koehler, Michigan State University
  • Joshua M. Rosenberg, Michigan State University

Focus of the Special Issue

Building upon Shulman’s (1986; 1987) influential notions of pedagogical content knowledge, or the knowledge needed to teach effectively (and differently) within different curriculum areas, educational technology researchers have embraced technological pedagogical content knowledge, or TPCK/TPACK (Angeli & Valanides, 2005; Mishra & Koehler, 2006; Niess, 2005).

TPACK scholarship examines how to develop, apply, and assess this knowledge in diverse education settings and content areas. During the last decade, multiple ways to understand and support its development have emerged, generating approximately 1,000 publications that utilize the construct, impacting the practice of postsecondary faculty, administrators, and others invested in meaningful educational uses of technology.

Perhaps inevitably, TPACK’s enthusiastic reception and rapid dissemination have generated multiple points of divergence which need further study, such as:

  • The specific nature of the knowledge that TPACK describes;
  • How to understand and describe contextual influences upon instructors’ TPACK;
  • How to measure this knowledge appropriately;
  • How to structure TPACK development in accordance with different adult learners’ needs.

Given the widespread diffusion of TPACK, research focusing upon these and related issues will help to determine the direction of future postsecondary learning and teaching with technologies. Therefore, this special issue of AJET will address future directions in TPCK/TPACK research and development. Please note that since AJET’s focus and scope address post-secondary education, submitted manuscripts should speak to TPCK/TPACK in higher education, professional learning/development for teachers and university faculty, and/or educators’ workplace learning.

Manuscript Submission Instructions 

Manuscripts addressing the special issue’s focus should be submitted through the AJET online manuscript submission system. Please review the Author Guidelines and Submission Preparation Checklist carefully, and prepare your manuscript accordingly. Information about the peer review process and criteria is also available for your perusal. 

NOTE: When submitting your manuscript, please include a note in the field called ‘Comments for the Editor’ indicating that you wish it to be considered for the “TPACK Future” special issue. Please direct questions about manuscript submissions to Judi Harris at: judi.harris@wm.edu.

Timeline

Manuscript submission deadline (firm): 12 December 2016    

Decisions and feedback on manuscripts: 1 March 2017            

Revised manuscripts due: 1 April 2017              

Expected Publication: May 2017

References

Angeli, C., & Valanides, N. (2005). Preservice elementary teachers as information and communication technology designers: An instructional systems design model based on an expended view of pedagogical content knowledge. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 21(4), 292-302. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2729.2005.00135.x

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1017-1054. Retrieved from http://www.tcrecord.org/content.asp?contentid=12516

Niess, M. L. (2005). Preparing teachers to teach science and mathematics with technology: Developing a technology pedagogical content knowledge. Teaching and Teacher Education, 21, 509-523. doi:10.1016/j.tate.2005.03.006

Shulman, L. S. (1987). Knowledge and teaching: Foundations of the new reform. Harvard Educational Review, 57(1), 1–22. doi:10.17763/haer.57.1.j463w79r56455411

Shulman, L. S. (1986). Those who understand: Knowledge growth in teaching. Educational Researcher, 15(2), 4–14. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/1175860

  

 


 

2017 SPECIAL ISSUE

Augmenting learner-generated contexts via mobile augmented reality and mobile virtual reality

Guest editors

  • Dr Thomas Cochrane, Centre for Learning And Teaching, Auckland University of Technology. thomas.cochrane@aut.ac.nz
  • Associate Professor Matthew Kearney, Teacher Education Program, University of Technology Sydney. matthew.kearney@uts.edu.au
  • Associate Professor Helen Farley, Australian Digital Futures Institute, University of Southern Queensland. Helen.Farley@usq.edu.au

Focus of the special issue

Mobile device ownership is ubiquitous, leading to many higher and further education institutions exploring a BYOD approach to mobile learning. However, most mobile learning projects are device centric and focus upon repurposing content for delivery to small screens and substitution of pre-existing pedagogical strategies. The potential of mobile learning is to enable new collaborative networked pedagogies and professional practice through enabling authentic learning beyond the classroom. This special issue invites papers that explore the boundaries of current knowledge and approaches to mobile learning, and specifically explore the unique affordances of mobile devices for learner-generated content and experiences via such technologies as collaborative media production and sharing, Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), Mixed Reality, geolocative and contextual sensors, drones and wearable technologies. 

The conceptual theme in this special issue focuses on the continuum between Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality, which are currently two of the hottest topics in emerging learning technologies. Coupled with the ubiquity of mobile device ownership, mobile AR and VR provide the potential to enhance educational technology research and practice on a level previously impractical. By focusing upon learner-generated contexts and learner-generated content the special issue will explore the application of mobile AR and VR enabling new emancipative pedagogies beyond adding another technology fad for content delivery and teacher-directed pedagogies. Of particular interest for this special issue is investigations in areas such as, but not restricted to:

  • Reviews of the state of the art of mobile augmented reality (AR) and mobile virtual reality (VR) in higher and further education
  • Reviews of the key themes in recent mobile learning research in higher and further education
  • Heutagogy and mobile AR and VR in higher and further education
  • Case studies in mobile AR and VR in higher and further education
  • Frameworks for mobile AR and VR in higher and further education 

The methodological theme for this special issue focuses on research approaches that move beyond simple comparative case studies, and explore the application of Design-Based Research as a methodology for designing authentic mobile learning. As such, a feature of this special issue will be to introduce the readership of AJET to the educational applications of mobile learning that they perhaps were unaware of or have not previously used. Topics of interest may include:

  • Mobile AR games in education;
  • Mobile VR games in education;
  • 360-degree mobile imagery in education, such as Google Maps and Google StreetView;
  • 360-degree mobile video in education, such as YouTube 360;
  • Connecting people to places using AR and VR
  • The use of contextual sensors in education, such as iBeacons;
  • The use of drones in education; and
  • Wearable technologies. 

Manuscript Submission Instructions 

Manuscripts addressing the special issue’s focus should be submitted through the AJET online manuscript submission system. Please review the Author Guidelines and Submission Preparation Checklist carefully, and prepare your manuscript accordingly. Information about the peer review process and criteria is also available for your perusal. 

NOTE: When submitting your manuscript, please include a note in the field called ‘Comments for the Editor’ indicating that you wish it to be considered for the “Mobile augmented learning” special issue. Please direct questions about manuscript submissions to Thomas Cochrane at: thomas.cochrane@aut.ac.nz.

Deadlines for authors

Submission deadline: 15 February 2017

Decision on manuscripts: 15 June 2017

Revised/final manuscripts: 1 August 2017

Expected Publication: August 2017

 

 


 

2017/18 SPECIAL ISSUE

Learning Design Research: Mapping the terrain

Guest editors

  • Associate Professor Eva Dobozy, Curtin Business School, Curtin University, eva.dobozy@curtin.edu.au
  • Ms Leanne Cameron, School of Education, The Australian Catholic University, leanne.cameron@acu.edu.au

Focus of the special issue

Learning Design is an emerging field of education research and educational practice. Its purpose is to provide support and guidance to educators teaching in online learning environments. More precisely, the new field of Learning Design aims to help educators understand how to develop, use and reuse contemporary pedagogical designs, many of which are built on social constructivist learning theory. Dobozy (2013) has defined Learning Design as “a way of making explicit epistemological and technological integration attempts by the designer of a particular learning sequence or series of learning sequences”.  In addition, the ‘Larnaca group’ authors make a clear distinction between Learning Design theory and practice. In a recent publication, they provided a visual representation of their current understanding of Learning Design as a pedagogical meta-model with three distinct but interconnected components (Dalziel, 2016). These are: a Learning Design Conceptual Map (LD-CM), a Learning Design Framework (LD-F), followed by Learning Design Practice (LD-P).  Learning Design is now acknowledged as a complex and integrated process, which includes stages of planning, designing, orchestrating and running of sequenced teaching and learning activities.

We have purposefully kept the focus of the theme for this special issue broad. The intent is to continue the dialogue among educators and learning designers and break down traditional academic silos. Movements towards interdisciplinarity, design thinking, open designs and the acceptance of a reuse philosophy have been gaining greater legitimacy.

This special issue invites papers from a wide range of disciplines, including, but not limited to higher education, neuroscience, cognitive science, psychology, computer science, and business, exploring Learning Design research and practice from a range of theoretical and technological perspectives.

Interdisciplinary and discipline-based empirical studies utilising quantitative or qualitative approaches are welcome. Conceptual papers will be considered. 

Topics for this special issue may include but are not limited to:

  • Interdisciplinary or discipline specific Learning Design research
  • Examinations of Learning Design technologies and/or models
  • Relationship between Learning Design and Learning Analytics
  • Relationship between Learning Design and Open Education
  • Relationship between Learning Design and MOOCs
  • Learning Design research methodologies
  • Learning Design in higher education
  • Learning Design in teacher education
  • Learning Design in school education

Manuscript Submission Instructions 

Submit through the AJET journal system - not directly to the editors.
Manuscripts addressing the special issue’s focus should be submitted through the AJET online manuscript submission system.

When submitting your manuscript, please include a note in the field called ‘Comments for the Editor’ indicating that you wish it to be considered for the “Learning Designs” special issue.

Manuscripts should be prepared in accordance with the Australasian Journal of Educational Technology’s guidelines and submission requirements. Please review the Author Guidelines and Submission Preparation Checklist carefully, and prepare your manuscript accordingly. All papers submitted to the special issue will be subjected to double-blind peer review.  For further information, please visit the AJET website (https://ajet.org.au/).

Please direct questions about manuscript submissions to either of the guest editors above.

AJET is indexed in Scopus, Thomson Reuters Web of Science, EDITLib, the ACER Blended Online Learning and Distance Education research bank and EBSCOhost Electronic Journals Service. AJET citation statistics appear within the Thomson Reuters ISI Journal Citation Reports (Social Science Citation Index), the Google Scholar Metrics and the Scopus SCImago journal rankings.

Deadlines for authors

Submission deadline: 15 April 2017

Decision on manuscripts: 15 August 2017

Revised/final manuscripts: 15 October 2017

Publication: anticipated Late 2017 / Early 2018